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A Moment in Pompeii: The band that can’t be destroyed

This year brings a new chapter for Geneva metalcore outfit A Moment in Pompeii. The band has seen integral members come and go, but is looking forward to the creation of new music that reflects the styles of their newer members. A Moment in Pompeii is currently comprised of Sam Allison, vocalist, Antonio DiBiasio, drummer, Doug Boylind, guitarist, and David Pinkerton, guitarist/vocalist.

The band was founded in 2014 by current members DiBiasio and Pinkerton, along with recently departed members Zac Podolinsky and Aaron Fritsch. Allison and Boylind joined in the fall of 2015. Credit for the band name goes to Fritsch, who came up with the name based on the city of Pompeii, which was destroyed in a moment by a volcano in 79 A.D.

In regards to this new chapter, Sam Allison, a sophomore biology major and lead vocalist for the band, stated, “We’re just excited to break out over this next year. We’ve been kind of stuck in the mud as a band . . . But we really feel good now. We’re going to truck through the end of this semester and into the next semester to become the band we want to be and try to get known around the Pittsburgh area.”

Drawing inspiration from Christian metal bands such as August Burns Red and For Today, A Moment in Pompeii seeks to bring light to dark places where God is not typically found.

DiBiasio goes on to say that stereotypically, not a lot of Christians listen to this type of music. But that’s what he loves about metal music: It can be used to share the gospel of Christ with others. Additionally, Allison spoke of his love for the genre as not necessarily due to the anger some associate with it, but to the lyrics and how they, “pierce you down to your soul.”

Recently, the band wrote a song dedicated to a friend with a mental disorder. Allison ranked that song as a favorite, saying, “It’s a very vulnerable song, especially when performing. You show people who you are and you ask God who He is.” This song is one example of the question that will be posed throughout their new music: Where is the truth?

The band recently performed on Friday, Jan. 13, headlining their “A Moment in Pompeii On Ice” show. It featured several other bands in Johnston Gym, including the Pittsburgh-based Until We Have Faces, local start-up Glasnost, and Chariots-cover band, Wagon Wheel.

Around seventy fans turned out for the show, and the members were encouraged to see so many friends show up and give support, even if not regular listeners of metal music.

“You could see the love not only for the band, but for the individuals in the band,” said Allison. “The crowd was so responsive.”

The group is looking forward to participating in the annual Geneva Angst Fest put on later in the semester by the Songwriters’ Coalition, along with looking to book more local gigs and shows.

“You don’t know what kind of impact you have and every little action you do is really important,” said DiBiasio. “You don’t know if you could be impacting fifty people or just one person. Every little thing that you do matters.”

To its members, the city of Pompeii is a testament to how quickly life can change. With this namesake in mind the band is working to make a difference with its music and performances in the future.

This feature is the first in a new Cabinet series featuring local bands, artists, and singer-songwriters. If you or your group would like to be featured in a future issue, please reach out to our editorial staff.




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